Join Our Newsletter





Events Calendar

« < August 2017 > »
S M T W T F S
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
Home arrow Market Research Findings arrow Environment arrow More Think it is Important to Give Than to Receive on Valentine?s Day
More Think it is Important to Give Than to Receive on Valentine?s Day PDF Print E-mail
Written by Harris Interactive   
14 Feb 2006

More Think it is Important to Give Than to Receive on Valentine’s Day, According to New Survey
Exchanging cards and going out for a romantic dinner top the list of activities being planned

ROCHESTER, N.Y. – February 9, 2006 – As Valentine’s Day approaches, it seems it is truly better to give than to receive. According to new survey results, 61 percent of U.S. adults who are currently in a relationship agree that it is very important to them that they buy a gift or plan a special activity for their current partner on Valentine’s Day, while only 31 percent agree that it is very important for them to receive a gift or have a special activity planned for them. Men, take warning – women are more likely than men (44% vs. 16%) to agree that it is important to have their current partner buy them a gift or plan a special activity.

These are the results of a nationwide online survey of 2,985 adults conducted between January 12 and 17, 2006 by Harris Interactive® in conjunction with eHarmony, the online relationship service.

When it comes to plans for this Valentine’s Day, 37 percent of adults currently in a relationship plan to celebrate by exchanging cards, one-third (33%) plan to go out for a romantic dinner, and just over one-quarter (28%) plan to exchange gifts. Men and women plan to celebrate in different ways. Women are slightly more likely than men to plan to cook a romantic dinner (19% vs. 13%), while men are more likely to plan to go out for a romantic dinner (38% vs. 29%). There are also significant generational differences in how adults plan to celebrate Valentine’s Day. Baby Boomers (those aged 40 to 58) are more likely to plan to exchange cards (43%), while Gen Xers (those aged 28 to 39) are more likely to plan to either exchange gifts (37%) or cook a romantic dinner (25%). The youngest generation, the Echo Boomers (those aged 18 to 27), are most likely to plan to exchange gifts (48%) and go out for a romantic dinner (47%), while Matures (those aged 65 and over) are most likely to have no special plans (48%).

As the poll suggests, Valentine’s Day is a day in which couples are willing to spend money. About one in five (22%) adults currently in a relationship say they will spend $76 or more on their gift or special activity this year. Fewer, four percent, say they will spend $51 to $75, while another 22 percent plan to spend between $36 and $50. Roughly the same numbers plan to spend between $21 and $35 (16%) or nothing at all (15%) this year for Valentine’s gifts or activities. The younger generations are more likely to say they will spend the big bucks this Valentine’s Day, as 30 percent of Gen Xers and 27 percent of Echo Boomers say they will spend over $76, compared to 20 percent of Baby Boomers and 12 percent of Matures.

In addition to looking at how couples plan to celebrate Valentine’s Day, the poll also examined relationships overall. Almost two-thirds (63%) of those currently involved in a relationship have been with their current partner for 10 years or more. Incidence of this is highest in the Midwest (70%) and lowest in the South (56%).

Other key findings on relationships include:

Those currently in a relationship are most likely to say they met their current partner at work (18%), through friends (14%) or at school (14%). Not surprisingly, Echo Boomers are much more likely to have met their current partner in school (34%).
Half (50%) of those currently in a relationship say they are completely satisfied with their relationship, while 30 percent say they are mostly satisfied. While similar percentages of men and women say they are completely satisfied (51% vs. 49%), women are more likely than men to say they are mostly satisfied (34% vs. 26%) with their relationship.
People seem to be in their relationships for the long haul. More than four in five (83%) adults who are currently in a relationship say they would never break up with their current partner, and 81 percent would describe their current partner as their soul mate.

Last Updated ( 14 Feb 2006 )
 
< Prev   Next >

Polls

How important is market research to start-ups in the current economic climate?
 

RSS Feeds

Subscribe Now